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Some Olympians get a little something extra to go with their medals.

Some Olympians get a little something extra to go with their medals.
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Some Olympians get a little something extra to go with their medals.

Some Olympians get a little something extra to go with their medals.

TOKYO – After winning a gold medal at the Summer Olympics, American wrestler Tamyra Mensah-Stock had big plans for the bonus money that comes with it: buying her mother a $ 30,000 food truck.

Tamerlan Bashaev, 25, a Russian judoka who won a bronze medal, wants to use his money to get married and go on his honeymoon. Andrea Proske, a rower who helped Canada win their first gold in the women’s eight since 1992, can’t wait to take her mother on vacation to London.

“I couldn’t see her,” said Proske, 35, who will receive C $ 20,000, or about US $ 16,000. “We’ve all been really in our own bubble. So just being able to kiss my mom for the first time since we came back from Covid is going to be special. “

Winning an Olympic medal is often the crowning achievement of an athlete’s career. Most Olympians, however, aren’t multi-millionaire athletes like Naomi Osaka, Rory McIlroy or Kevin Durant, so competing at this elite level can be a financial struggle.

But many Olympic medalists leave Tokyo with more than just prizes. They get an extra boost behind the scenes in the form of bonuses. Winning fills the wallet well in some countries – a fact that arouses some fear and even some envy among medal winners.

Some of the bonuses are substantial: the million Singapore dollars in local currency (about $ 740,000 in the US) for a gold medal is the biggest known award. Some are more modest: an American medalist receives $ 37,500 for gold, $ 22,500 for silver and $ 15,000 for bronze. The other bonuses are non-existent, like those of the British, New Zealand and Norwegian medalists.

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